The first thing I came across was OpenID, I got a MyOpenID account when I first signed up for Ma.gnolia. Thanks to Simon Willison's excellent tutorial I managed to set up my home page as a proxy (not that I use it).

This is all well and good, but an OpenID doesn't really capture who I am - it's the label for the thing rather than the thing itself. All I use it for is to log in to the sites which support it, it doesn't connect back to me or what I'm doing. A more interesting candidate for this role is something like Jeremy Keith's Life Stream idea - a record of everything he's done online collected from various RSS feeds. I could have just downloaded his PHP script, but I thought it might make a nice little learning project if I implemented my own in Ruby on Rails. Of course, I thought that and then, for several weeks, didn't actually do anything about it. Then last week I started exploring Mugshot, which I'd had installed on my Fedora box for many months but hadn't really seen the point of before. Mugshot lets you add your del.icio.us, last.fm, reddit and twitter accounts, as well as your blog and LinkedIn details, and then, through the magic of RSS, keeps track of all of it. Very like a life stream. Of course, it's not perfect, it's no help for anything which isn't on the list of supported services and even something as simple as someone having two blogs is beyond it, but it's easy enough to setup and it will do for now.

So, how to link your OpenID to your life, as defined by your Mugshot life stream? Enter claimID:

A claimID is essentially a profile. Some people have called it a "link resume." It is a place for you to show the world the stuff about you - your hyperlinked identity. To get started, all you need to do is start saving the links that make up you online identity to claimID. Once you save the links, you will have a public claimID page that you can use as an OpenID, a homepage, or whatever else you might like.

I could have set up a page on one of my websites to proxy my OpenID login and also list all of this stuff (and, at some point, I probably will, just for the fun of it), but it's nice in the meantime to have all these pre-built solutions available.